What are Nursing Pre- Registration Programs?

February 28, 2012 · Posted in Education · Comment 

To be eligible to perform as a nurse, people need to have at least degree or diploma in nursing (a “pre-registration” programme). This certificate allows them to practice as a nurse in NHS. Nursing pros are the mix of all ages, genders and cultures as people are interested by nursing field. The nursing Diploma degree consists of 50% practical and 50% theory. The theoretical courses are conducted in Higher Education Institute (HEI) and for practical studies; placements are organized in a variety of healthcare settings.

Nursing Branches

The branches that offer Pre registration degrees and diploma programmes are adult, children (pediatric), learning incapacity and mental health. Prior to applying for a nursing programme, you have to decide which of the 4 branches of nursing you wish to train. Some HEIs may allow you to select your nursing branch after the commencement of the course.

Few schools might provide “dual branch pre-registration courses” which allows you to apply in two branches of nursing simultaneously. Therefore you must consult with your HEI before trying for the course. The 12 months long common foundation course (CFC) is taught in all four branches of nursing before specialisation. It means that that the 1st year courses are common for the students of all branches.

Pre- registration Programs

Pre-registration diploma of higher education in nursing (Dip HE nursing) and Pre-registration nursing degree

The course work and time duration for Pre-registration diploma of higher education in nursing (Dip HE nursing) and Pre-registration nursing degree are similar. The programme usually consists 3 years long course that include a year common foundation programme (CFP), followed by two years in 1 of the 4 branches of nursing: adult, mental well-being, learning incapacities or children’s nursing. On completion, students are given both an educational and a pro qualification, thru integrated study of theory and supervised nursing practice.

Recognizing previous learning in theory and practice

The previous learning may include relevant degree or other studies, or important practice experience in a nursing or related discipline. It depends on the programmes offered by further education institution (HEI) but may be a health-related or biology-based degree. Previous theoretical and practice knowledge can often be used to meet some of the programme requirements which enables completion within a short period of time.

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Are NHS waiting list targets bad news for patients?

January 31, 2012 · Posted in Health · Comment 

The NHS is a colossal institution, and the number of patients that must be treated by it is unimaginable. Because of this, it is a massively over burdened institution. Not only does it have to account for, and make sure all its staff are behaving professionally; it also has the mammoth task of making every patient feel well looked after, and helping as many as they can, as quick as they can.

And what’s more, this has to be done on an extremely limited budget. There are so many treatments that would help save lives, that cannot be used by the NHS due to lack of money. All of this, coupled with the lack of space, means that often really ill people are forced to wait on waiting lists to get the treatment they need. One in which people have tried to tackle this problem is by putting targets in place for how long a patient should have to wait, or how long waiting lists should be.

This method of tackling the issue is not helpful, however. It is the medical professionals, the doctors and nurses, who know how best to treat their patients. They will not, therefore, treat people for longer than they have to, for they know there are people waiting to be treated just outside the door, so to speak. And yet, ministers interfere and put down unrealistic targets, which threaten punishment for those who fail to meet them, and which can only be met by falling short of the quality of care required.

I’m sure you have seen headlines in the past about the fact that people have been taken off waiting lists in order to keep within targets set. Another way in which targets have been met is by treating people faster, and with less caution than is required. If the professionals were to treat people how they saw best, the waiting lists would not meet the targets set.

In short, if there is not enough money or resources, then only a certain amount of people can be treated at one time. Placing targets onto professionals to try and increase the amount of people seen over time, will not change how much resources there are, and will only serve to compromise care.

Speak to specialist clinical negligence solicitors about claiming compensation.